The Russian threat is real for G-7 and NATO

At the G-7 summit in Germany that began the week, leaders from the seven largest industrial democracies agreed to continue providing military and humanitarian aid to Ukraine.

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Editorials

July 1, 2022 - 2:35 PM

U.S. President Joe Biden gestures as he addresses the media during a news conference at the NATO summit at the Ifema congress center in Madrid, on June 30, 2022. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images/TNS)

By definition, meetings of global leaders are important even if they’re not always consequential.

This week’s G-7 and NATO summits were substantive, particularly in producing a more clear-eyed view of Russia. Whether the decisions and declarations made are enough to turn the tide for Ukraine in its existential fight against Russia’s invasion remains to be seen. Still, the commitment of enduring support was critical.

At the G-7 summit in Germany that began the week, leaders from the seven largest industrial democracies (the U.S., U.K., France, Germany, Italy, Japan and Canada) agreed to continue providing military and humanitarian aid to Ukraine.

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